Today In History

Today In History

The middle section of the waterway took three years, and the entire canal was completed in 1825, at a total cost of $1.5 million, which is about $3 million today.
On this day in history, the Declaration of Independence was adopted by a three-to-one majority on July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. President George H.W. Bush and his wife Ann died the same day, July 5, in Washington, D.C., en route to Philadelphia to adopt her. Vice President John F. Kennedy and Secretary of State James Madison died on June 22, 1876, at their home in New York City. Presidential candidate and future president Calvin Coolidge was born in Plymouth, Vermont, in 1872.
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev is greeted by President George H.W. Bush at the 1990 Washington Summit. In 2009, former U.S. Republican Ron Paul, R-Texas, was shot dead at a church in Wichita, Kansas. On that day in history, a group of former members of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) felt free to step forward and break a 30-year silence.
Oscar winner James Horner was killed in a car crash on his way home from a concert in Los Angeles, California, on April 14, 1997. Oscar-winning actor and former U.S. President George H.W. Bush died in Southampton, England, in 1997.
A steamy tale of the rich and famous, including Princess Daisy, who died in a car crash on her way to the racetrack. Hall was banned by officials at Santa Anita Racetrack, and no racing season was scheduled to begin at the California racetrack until Dec. Oscar winner James Horner and former US President George H.W. Bush died on April 14, 1997 at a race track in Los Angeles, California.
In 1775, General George Washington took command of the Continental Army in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and it ended with a significant victory for the North when Confederate troops failed to break the Union’s positions in an attack known as the Pickett Charge. The North Carolina State Lottery reported a record payout after the winning number in the “Pick 4” game was converted to 0 – 0.0 -0. There were no winning tickets, but a total of $1.5 million in prize money, down from $0.1 million the previous day.
The first carrier attack of the Korean War took place, with the USS Valley Forge and HMS Triumph sending warplanes towards the North to Korean targets. The Battle of Britain began when the Luftwaffe began attacking southern England, the first major battle of the Second World War.
In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson personally handed over the Treaty of Versailles (VECR – SY) to the Senate and urged its ratification. The Democratic convention in Denver nominated William Jennings Bryan as president in 1908.
On July 13, 2013, a jury in Sanford, Florida, acquitted neighborhood watch officer George Zimmerman of murdering Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old unarmed black man. Jury selection took place in the trial of John T. Scopes, who was accused of violating the law by teaching Darwinian evolutionary theory.
In 1787, the Confederacy’s Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance, which established government in the area that corresponds to today’s – today’s Midwest and upper Midwest. In 1812, New York became the first US city to pass a law on how pawnbrokers could do business.
Boris N. Yeltsin takes the oath of office as the first elected president of the Russian Republic. In 1863, the Civil War broke out in New York City between the United States and the Confederate States of America (US).
The US women’s national soccer team won the World Cup for the first time by beating China 2-1 in the final of the tournament in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 1992, a New York jury found that United Airlines, the parent company of American Airlines (USA), was responsible for a terrorist bomb that destroyed Flight 103 in 1988, killing 270 people, paving the way for a civil lawsuit. Nicolas Mahut of France defeated the United States in a goalless play-off at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.
Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley became the first Southern governor to use executive authority to remove Confederate flags and secessionist symbols from the graves of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and other rebel soldiers in the capital Montgomery after they removed them. Five years ago, a federal judge in Boston formally sentenced former Boston Marathon bomber Osama bin Laden to death for the 2013 terrorist attack.
On July 13, 2013, a jury in Sanford, Florida, acquitted neighborhood watch officer George Zimmerman of murder charges, which he had been convicted of in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by a police officer in 2012. A year ago, the driver of a pickup truck involved in a collision in New Hampshire that killed seven motorcyclists was charged with seven counts of negligent homicide.
In 1787, the Confederacy’s Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance, which established government in an area that is now the Midwest and Upper Midwest. In 1812, New York became the first US city to pass a law on how pawnbrokers could do business, and in 1863, a civil war broke out between black and white police departments in New York City.

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